Vinaora Nivo Slider 3.xVinaora Nivo Slider 3.xVinaora Nivo Slider 3.xVinaora Nivo Slider 3.x
1000 characters left

 

 Care Pages Guide

Sensitivity:

Level 1 - These corals are easy to care for, good for the novice aquarists.
Level 2 - These corals require slightly more attention than level 1 corals, but are generally tolerant and forgiving.
Level 3 - These corals require stable, established aquariums and care by an
experienced aquarist.
Level 4 - These corals should only be kept by the most experienced aquarists.
Level 5 - These corals are not known to be able to survive in aquariums even when under the care of the most experienced aquarists

Note that this scale is not set in stone, but based on the numerous experiences and reports of professional and hobby aquarists.  The sensitivity and tolerance of any given coral in your tank will depend on species, health when collected/purchased, how long it's been in captivity, and other factors that may or may not be knowable.   

Lighting Scale (approximations):

Level 0 - no light
...
Level 3 - one foot below modest VHO or T5 fluorescent lighting
...
Level 5 - two feet below extensive VHO or T5 fluorescent lighting
...
Level 6 - one foot below extensive VHO or T5 fluorescent lighting
Level 7 - two feet below 250 watt single ended MH light (or 150-175 watt MH with HQI ballast)
Level 8 - one foot below 250 watt single ended MH light (or 150-175 watt  MH with HQI ballast)

...
Level 10 - one foot below 400 watt single ended MH (or 250 watt MH with HQI ballast)


Note that this scale is quite crude and only meant to provide a rough idea of the different levels of light intensities.  How much (and what kind of) light actually reaches the corals in your tank also depends on the type of reflector in the light fixture, the temperature of the bulbs/lamps, the clarity of your tank water, etc.  

It's  also important to note that different individual corals, even of the same species, can have very different lighting requirements and ideals.  Often times, the same types and species of wild caught corals come from different depths and different water clarities.  It's nearly impossible to know what kind or how much light was getting to your coral when it was first taken from the wild.  One advantage of aquacultured corals is that you can know what light they were grown under.  Beyond health, the color of any given zooxanthellate (photosynthetic) coral will change and adapt in response to the lighting it is placed under.  All corals are vulnerable to bleaching if not allowed to acclimate to a change to more intense lighting.  If your coral begins to bleach, move it to an area of lower lighting and feed it especially well.

This Weeks Featured POP